March 31, 2006:
The Not A Cornfield project team has handed the keys to the Cornfield site back to State Parks and moved across the street into our new offices at 1745 Spring St.
Contact State Parks for public access and information about tours and open hours.

PROGRAM ARCHIVES


Most recent image from webcam.

Watch short films about the project

GROUP TOURS

For Group and school tours, please call Carmelo Alvarez at (323) 226-1158


 

 

project  missionartlandcornpublic eventsblogteampartnerscontact
 

THE GOLD PHASE (October 23 - December 4, 2005)

From brown to green to gold to blue: having cleared the way and laid the infrastructure for the dreams of others to be actualized, the art project Not A Cornfield will end. The seeds for this state park as a space full of life will have been germinated.

“Artists need to create on the same scale that society has the capacity to destroy.” Lauren Bon, 2005

STAY INFORMED
PROJECT BLOG

DIRECTIONS + MAP
JOIN OUR EMAIL LIST

MULTIMEDIA
PHOTO GALLERY
VIDEO SHORTS
AUDIO SLIDESHOWS
LIVE WEBCAM
AUDIO STREAM

GOLD PHASE EVENTS

Join us each Sunday afternoon from October 23 to December 4.

From October 26-November 6, Not A Cornfield presents “La Ofrenda (The Offering): Halloween to Day of the Dead.”

The Not a Cornfield site will remain open to visitors during our normal hours throughout the Gold Phase and all events are free.

RELATED LINKS
CA STATE PARKS PLANS FUTURE USE OF THE SITE

Listen to the sounds (mp3) of the dry and brittle corn plants as recorded on Nov. 28.
- Not A Cornfield photo by Jaime Lopez. See more of Jaime's photos here

As October moves into November, the irrigation lines have been lifted from the Not A Cornfield site and a gold blush slowly spreads through the field as the corn dries out in readiness for harvest. Once harvested, the corn stalks, leaves and husks will be processed into ecyclable materials, the majority of the ears will be used to produce ethanol, and the rest will be saved for seed stock.

A late crop grown to be stored against winter scarcity, corn has long been a cross-cultural symbol of abundance after labor, and hope for the coming of spring. At the same time, the corn harvest is also associated with such markers of autumn’s shortening days and lengthening nights as Halloween and the Day of the Dead.

We invite you all to come and work, play, and celebrate the corn, the cornfield, and the season with us. The corn will be hand-harvested in such a way that a series of half-acre ‘rooms’ will be opened up in the field, providing arenas for a variety of activities in addition to gathering the corn.

- Not A Cornfield photo by Steve Rowell.

The Colors of the Cornfield

Last year the earth in which this corn now grows was gray. A century of industrial use, coupled with the jacketing of the LA River in concrete, had left the soil of a once-fertile flood plain polluted, desiccated, and strewn with trash. While the site, commonly known as the Cornfield, had been designated the Los Angeles State Historic Park in 2001, the process of creating it as a park was lengthy and challenging, and it seemed likely that the earth would remain gray and lifeless for at least the immediate future.

Over the course of the past six months the Not A Cornfield project has caused this 32-acre plot to be cleaned, leveled, augmented by 1,500 truckloads of good dirt, irrigated, powered with electricity, and planted with corn - a crop that further leaches pollutants from the ground. Today no longer gray, the earth is a rich brown and the lush green stalks it hosts are bearing a golden harvest. From gray to brown to green to gold, Not A Cornfield has reclaimed an arid plot of land for fertility and public use.

More than a practical intervention intended to transform the soil however, the project also opens up a space for contemplation and possibility. Seeded by the artist’s dream in which this area she has known from childhood was abundant with corn and awash in blue light, Not A Cornfield will conclude as it began, in the blue of dreams. For once harvested the field will be lit by blue light, the color symbolic of reverie, yearning, faithfulness and distance.

From brown to green to gold to blue: having cleared the way and laid the infrastructure for the dreams of others to be actualized, the art project Not A Cornfield will end. The seeds for this state park as a space full of life will have been germinated.

“Artists need to create on the same scale that society has the capacity to destroy.” Lauren Bon, 2005

STAY TUNED FOR THE BLUE PHASE (Beginning December 3, 2005)

 

 
 
© 2005 Not A Cornfield LLC |  Legal + Copyright | *External links are not associated with Not A Cornfield LLC